Lektion 3: Auslandsstudium

Hören

Vor dem Hören

Möchten Sie im Ausland studieren? Warum? Wo? Gibt es Austauschprogramme oder Auslandstudium-Möglichkeiten an Ihrer Uni?

Erfahrungen

INSERT VIDEO

Arbeiten mit dem Hören

Wie war es im Ausland für diese Personen? Was machten Sie? Was studierten Sie?

Strukturen

Imperfekt – unregelmässige Verben

So far you’ve learned about the Imperfekt with modal verbs and weak, regular, and rule-following verbs. In this section we’ll cover the irregular, strong, non-rule-following, and different-rule-following verbs. (That seems like a lot, but it’s not so bad.) If you encounter a verb that was “irregular” in either present tense or Perfekt, it will be “irregular” here too.

Let’s look at these exceptions one at a time.

Starke Verben

First we have strong verbs. As you learned there are strong and weak verbs. We have encountered these in the present tense and with the Perfekt. The weak verbs follow the rules, but the strong verbs fight against the rules – even though they have their own rules. Here are the rules for the strong verbs.

  1. change the vowel (or in some cases the consonant)
  2. add the strong verb ending.

You will note that this is very similar to what we do with modal verbs as well, but the endings are different. Some examples include fahren, lesen, and gehen. Take a look at the chart below to see how this works.

 Endungfahrenlesengehen
Singular
ich-fuhrlasging
du-stfuhrstlas(e)st
last
gingst
Sie-enfuhrenlasengingen
sie / es / er-fuhrlasging
Plural
wir-enfuhrenlasengingen
ihr-tfuhrtlastgingt
Sie-enfuhrenlasengingen
sie-enfuhrenlasengingen

As you can see, the endings on these are different than on weak verbs, but they still follow a pattern/rule. Note the vowel changes. If you remember, fahren and lesen both had vowel changes in the present tense for “du” and “sie / es / er” forms. This should be a clue that they will have a vowel change here too – just a different vowel change. There are some general guidelines that you can follow to figure out how the vowels will change, but for the most part you just have to memorize it. (I know that’s not what you wanted to hear.)

Gemischte Verben

In addition to these strong somewhat rule following verbs, we also have verbs that are often called “mixed verbs” or “irregular verbs” depending on the grammar textbook. The important thing to know about these verbs is that they are a combination of the weak verb endings, and the strong verb vowel changes and sometimes consonant changes. Modal verbs can often be considered in this category

Here are the rules for the mixed verbs verbs.

  1. change the vowel (or in some cases the consonant)
  2. add the weak verb ending
 Endungbringenwissenkennen
Singular
ich-tebrachtewusstekannte
du-testbrachtestwusstestkanntest
Sie-tenbrachtenwusstenkannten
sie / es / er-tebrachtewusstekannte
Plural
wir-tenbrachtenwusstenkannten
ihr-tetbrachtetwusstetkanntet
Sie-tenbrachtenwusstenkannten
sie-tenbrachtenwusstenkannten

So, how do you know when it’s a mixed/irregular verb? Great question. You memorize it. Make some flashcards for the verbs that you think you’ll use a lot and practice them. Find something that works for you.

Let’s practice them a bit here.

H5P for practicing mixed verbs.